Tatjana Pavlov-West

Images of the Wounded Mouth: Dissonant Approaches to Trauma in Literary, Visual and Performance Cultures

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Images of ‘wounded mouths’ occur frequently in literary and visual artworks artefacts from both the Global South and the Global North and often imply some form of language loss in relation to trauma. There is, however, a decisive difference between language loss as a symptomatic reaction towards a single traumatic event as explained by Western trauma theorists, and language loss as part of an insidious trauma, caused and perpetuated by continuing forms of structural discrimination. This study contrasts literary and visual images from the Global South to the Global North so as to understand strategies of trauma confrontation within the ambit of what it terms Global South trauma theory.

Inhalt:
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

INTRODUCTION: Images of the Wounded Mouth
Concept and Purpose
The Loss of Language and the Absence of Speech
Outline of Chapters

PART I: TONGUE-TIED

TONGUE-TIED: INTRODUCTION
Methodology
Structure

CHAPTER ONE: Vitiated Voices in Jones’s Sorry
Western Trauma
Insidious Trauma
Affective Ties

CHAPTER TWO: Audible Crying in Miller’s REwind
Western Trauma Theory
Insidious Trauma
Affective Ties/Cries

CHAPTER THREE: Silent Weeping in Searle’s Mute
Western Trauma
Insidious Trauma
Affective Ties

TONGUE-TIED: CONCLUSION – De Kok’s A Room Full of Questions

PART II: MUTED MOUTHS

MUTED MOUTHS: INTRODUCTION
Methodology
Structure

CHAPTER FOUR: Muzzled Mouths
Bailey’s “Still-life with Negro”
Aestheticized Horror
The Returned Gaze
Framing the Victim
Lôbo’s Iron Mask, White Torture
Anastácia’s Gaze
Taking off the Muzzle
The Female Black Panther
Speech as Resistance
Conclusion: An Entangled History of Black Female
Empowerment

CHAPTER FIVE: Sealed Lips
Bailey’s “Survival of the Fittest”
Ethnography
Social Darwinism
Contemporary Migration Policies
Al Assad’s “Asylum” in Dialogue with Parr’s Close the Concentration Camps
The Refugee Camp as a Zone of Indistinction
Homo Sacer as a Threat
Denial of a Shared Humanity

CHAPTER SIX: Suffocating Silence
Waterboarding and the Perpetuation of Victimization
The South African TRC and the Jeffrey Benzien Amnesty
Hearing
The Ticking Bomb Threat and the Global War on Terror
The Loss of Humanity
An Exception to the Exception – Empowering Protest
Questioning the State of Exception: Yazir Henry
World Can’t Wait: Turning the Threat Inside Out
De Kok’s “What kind of man?” and the Loss of Humanity

MUTED MOUTHS: CONCLUSION

CONCLUSION: The Cut-Off Tongue

APPENDIX
“Tongue-Tied” by Ingrid de Kok from Terrestial Things (2002)
“The Archbishop chairs the first session” by Ingrid de Kok from Terrestial Things (2002)
“The transcriber speaks” by Ingrid de Kok from Terrestial Things (2002)
“Sorry Song” (1998; 2007) by Kerry Fletcher
South Africa’s national anthem “Nkosi sikelel' iAfrika” (1997)
“Beasts of No Nation” (1989) by Fela Kuti
“On My Way Out I Passed Over You and the Verrazano Bridge” (1986) by Audre Lorde

BIBLIOGRAPHY
PRIMARY SOURCES
Literary texts
Artworks
Music
Films / TV series
SECONDARY SOURCES

Autoreninformation:
Tatjana Pavlov-West ist Research Associate der Universität von Pretoria in Südafrika, Dozentin für englischsprachige Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaften, Visual Cultural Studies sowie Lehrkraft für Englisch und Französisch an einer Waldorfschule.
Mehr Informationen
ISBN 978-3-8233-8412-0
EAN 9783823384120
Seiten 270
Format gebunden
Ausgabename 18412
Verlag Gunter Narr Verlag
Autor Tatjana Pavlov-West
Erscheinungsdatum 23.11.2020
Lieferzeit 1-3 Tage
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