Antoinina Bevan Zlatar, Olga Timofeeva

What is an Image in Medieval and Early Modern England?

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The premise that Western culture has undergone a ‘pictorial turn’ (W.J.T. Mitchell) has prompted renewed interest in theorizing the visual image. In recent decades researchers in the humanities and social sciences have documented the function and status of the image relative to other media, and have traced the history of its power and the attempts to disempower it. What is an Image in Medieval and Early Modern England? engages in this debate in two interrelated ways: by focusing on the (visual) image during a period that witnessed the Reformation and the invention of the printing press, and by exploring its status in relation to an array of texts including Arthurian romance, saints’ lives, stage plays, printed sermons, biblical epic, pamphlets, and psalms. This interdisciplinary volume includes contributions by leading authorities as well as younger scholars from the fields of English literature, art history, and Reformation history. As with all previous collections of essays produced under the auspices of the Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies, it seeks to foster dialogue between the two periods.

Autoreninformation:
Antoinina Bevan Zlatar is a Senior Teaching and Research Associate at the English Department of the University of Zurich. She holds a Doctorate from the University of Geneva and a BA from the University of Oxford. She is the author of Reformation Fictions: Polemical Protestant Dialogues in Elizabethan England (OUP, 2011). She is currently preparing a monograph titled ‘Making and Breaking Images in Milton’s England’ for which she was awarded a Swiss National Science Foundation research grant.
Mehr Informationen
ISBN 978-3-8233-8150-1
EAN 9783823381501
Seiten 300
Format kartoniert
Ausgabename 18150
Verlag Gunter Narr Verlag
Erscheinungsdatum 04.12.2017
Lieferzeit 1-3 Tage
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